Computerworld’s Top 100 ‘Best Places To Work’ Remove Walls Between IT and Business To Create Greater Career Paths

FRAMINGHAM, MA – JUNE 4, 2001 — IDG’s Computerworld, an information services company for the IT leader community, today unveiled its Ninth Annual Best Places to Work in Information Technology rankings. Based on the criteria that prospective employees find most important, companies were measured on diversity, training, career development, benefits, hot projects, and retention. These were combined to select the overall best companies.

 

The top 10 Best Places to Work in IT are as follows:

1. Home Depot Atlanta

2. Nationwide Insurance Columbus, Ohio

3. Harrah’s Entertainment Las Vegas

4. Avon Products Rye, N.Y.

5. International Truck and Engine Corp. Chicago

6. Vanguard Group of Investment Cos. Malvern, Pa.

7. Avnet Phoenix

8. FleetBoston Financial Boston

9. USAA San Antonio, Texas

10. PricewaterhouseCoopers Edison, N.J.

Despite the slowing of the economy, companies that want to be viewed as top employers at attracting and keeping technology workers are still investing heavily in training, benefits, and career development of their staff.

"Keeping IT staff excited and challenged in a slowing economy is one of the difficult challenges that our top companies are dealing with this year," said David Weldon, feature editor IT Careers, Computerworld. "The current economic downturn has forced companies to think differently about corporate incentives. They have had to learn to keep employees happy in times of salary freezes and uncertainty about the future. As a result, our winners have become experts in communication in order to retain good employees."

"Today’s CIOs and other top business executives have learned to work in conjunction for the good of the corporation," said Maryfran Johnson, editor in chief, Computerworld. "Companies that are succeeding in today’s marketplace are integrating technology and management functions and creating diverse career tracks for employees, making it easier to move from technology to business management positions, and vice versa."

Computerworld conducted an online survey of CIOs, vice presidents and hiring executives at Fortune 1000 and major high-tech consulting firms January through March 2001. Criteria for the Best Places list included revenue size and a minimum IT staff of 15. Two hundred and thirty companies met the criteria and were evaluated to create the Top 100 list.

The Top 100 all excelled in the six categories (diversity, training, career development, benefits, hot projects, and retention), but there were also similarities in their corporate philosophy. Computerworld found that several of the winners had the following three principals in common: information technology was central to their success; management took an active role in employee careers from day one; and there were no walls between IT and business.

In addition to the Top 100 list, each individual category was rated and the Top 10 companies were selected. For a complete list of the "100 Best Places to Work" or the individual category lists, point your browser to www.computerworld.com/bestplaces. To speak to a Computerworld editor, please contact Iain Pollock at (781) 915-5015 or ipollock@marenghi.com.

Based on 34 years of industry-respected editorial and news analysis, Computerworld delivers, in print and online, a comprehensive set of analysis services and tools for managing the problems and issues IT professionals face daily. With real time peer-to-peer executive forums and market-driven editorial such as ROI magazine, Computerworld offers sound technology advice and guidance for today’s challenging business environment.

About Computerworld

Based in Framingham, Mass., Computerworld, Inc. is a complete information services company for the IT Leader community, providing print and online publications, books, conferences and research services. The company’s flagship weekly newspaper for IT Leaders has been recognized numerous times by Folio: Magazine and the Computer Press Association as the best computer newspaper. With a circulation of 250,000, Computerworld has a total audience of 935,200, according to IntelliQuest CIMS v.7.0. News and resources for the IT Leader community are available at www.computerworld.com.

Computerworld is a business unit of International Data Group (IDG), the world’s leading IT media, research and exposition company. IDG publishes more than 300 magazines and newspapers and 4,000 book titles and offers online users the largest network of technology-specific sites around the world through IDG.net (www.idg.net), which comprises more than 270 targeted Web sites in 70 countries.

IDG is also a leading producer of 168 computer-related expositions worldwide, and provides IT market analysis through 50 offices in 43 countries worldwide. Company information is available at www.idg.com