IDG’S Computerworld Launches ROI Supplement, Examining Technology Decisions From a Business Perspective

FRAMINGHAM, MASS – MARCH 12, 2001 — ComputerworldROI, a new editorial supplement focused on the business payback of information technology (IT), today hits the desks of 250,000 Computerworld subscribers and debuts online at www.computerworld.com/roi/.

 

Written for business strategists and senior executives, ComputerworldROI examines the top issues concerning today's business and technology leaders. Topping that list is increasing the value that technology brings to business results and the bottom line. The print version of ComputerworldROI will be published every two months and distributed to Computerworld subscribers along with their regular Computerworld issues. Fresh ComputerworldROI content also will appear weekly online at http://www.computerworld.com/roi/.

"Our editorial studies revealed that the great IT challenge is determining ROI, or technology payback – proving the value of technology investments from a business perspective," said Maryfran Johnson, Computerworld editor-in-chief. "The savvy, strategic use of IT is proving to be the biggest single driver of thriving businesses today. We created ComputerworldROI to help senior executives understand how technology can help their businesses succeed."

Veteran business and technology journalist Julia King serves as ComputerworldROI's executive editor and oversees an editorial team largely comprised of outside contributors and freelancers with business journalism expertise, separate from the existing Computerworld editorial staff.

"The stories in ROI focus on the bottom-line value technology brings to businesses and not the technologies themselves," said Julia King, ComputerworldROI executive editor. "A classic ROI story might explore how a company justified a new Internet ordering system, the risks it encountered installing it and its impact on both near-term quarterly earnings and longer-term financial results. What it wouldn't go into are all of the technical specifics of networking protocols and programming code. Business leaders don't need all the `plumbing' details. What they do want and need to know are the financial upsides and downsides and ways to measure them."

With the expectation that existing Computerworld subscribers, an elite group of CIOs and IT executives, will share ComputerworldROI content with their boardroom peers to deepen understanding about technology choices and options, new and existing Computerworld advertisers already have signed on for the supplement. These include ADIC, APC, AT&T Business, Computer Associates, Genuity, Kintana, Semio, St. Bernard Software, Tonic Software, Visual Networks and Windows 2000 Advantage. The debut issue of ComputerworldROI will be distributed at a number of industry trade shows and conferences over the next several months, including Internet World, the Future Forum 2001 on Wireless Technologies, the Internet and eBusiness Conference, Comdex and Storage Networking World, among others.

ComputerworldROI's content includes regular departments, in-depth features and business case studies, with jargon-free, practical examples of how companies are accelerating technology payback. Successes and failures are measured in business terms, such as decreased operating costs or increased inventory turns, rather than technology terms, such as faster data speeds. The premier issue of ComputerworldROI includes stories on how Web-savvy companies are measuring the business value of their Internet investments; how a growing trend of hiring non-technology managers as CIOs is changing the CIO role; why one out of two sales force automation projects fails; and the valuable lessons failed dotcoms have to teach companies launching e-businesses.

Computerworld, Inc. is a complete information services company for the IT Leader community, providing print and online publications, books, conferences and research services. The company's flagship weekly newspaper for IT Leaders has been recognized numerous times by Folio: Magazine and the Computer Press Association as the best computer newspaper. With a circulation of 250,000, Computerworld, has a total audience of 935,000 according to IntelliQuest CIMS v.7.0. News and resources for the IT Leader community are available through Computerworld's Web site at www.computerworld.com. Computerworld is based in Framingham, MA.

Computerworld is a business unit of IDG, the world's leading IT media, research and exposition company. IDG publishes more than 300 magazines and newspapers and 4,000 book titles and offers online users the largest network of technology-specific sites around the world through IDG.net (http://www.idg.net), which comprises more than 270 targeted Web sites in 70 countries.

IDG is also a leading producer of 168 computer-related expositions worldwide, and provides IT market analysis through 50 offices in 43 countries worldwide. Company information is available at http://www.idg.com.