IDG’s PC World Becomes the World’s Largest Computer Magazine

SAN FRANCISCO – AUGUST 16, 2000 – Confirming its leadership position in high-tech publishing, PC World has surpassed PC Magazine to become the largest circulated computer magazine. According to the latest Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC) Fas-Fax Report for the six months ending June 30, 2000, PC World grew its total average paid circulation 3.4% to an all-time high of 1,268,016 — an unprecedented 41,308 more copies per issue than PC Magazine, which actually declined year to year. Further analysis shows PC World delivered a substantial bonus over rate base, comfortably serving advertisers an average bonus of 18,016.

 

Rate Base Total Average Total Average Net Change %Increase

Six Months Paid Paid Average Average

Ended Circulation Circulation Paid Paid

6/30/00 Six Months Six Months Circulation Circulation

Ended Ended

6/30/00 6/30/99

PC WORLD 1,250,000 1,268,016 1,225,746 42,270 3.4%

PC Magazine 1,225,000 1,226,708 1,227,799 (1,091) (0.1%)

ZD Smart

Business* 1,033,333* 1,054,531 1,026,034 28,497 2.8%

* PC Computing changed its name to Ziff Davis Smart Business and its rate

base from 1,050,000 to 1,000,000 with its May 2000 issue.

"There are two measures of a magazine's effectiveness," commented Jeff Edman, president and CEO of PC World Communications, Inc. "The first is circulation vitality. PC World's ascension to become the most widely circulated computer magazine shows it's done the best job serving its target readers: PC-proficient managers. In fact, Spring 2000 MRI reports that among all measured computer and business publications, PC World reaches the most managers who bought computer products for business, and does it at the lowest CPM."

"The second measure is advertiser retention," Edman continued. "According to internal page counts, in July and August, the two months during which PC Magazine publishes a single issue, PC World carried significantly more advertising, running 337 pages to PC Magazine's 312 — and far ahead of Ziff Davis Smart Business, which trailed at just 206 pages."

An excellent source for active computer product buyers and future subscribers, newsstand purchasers are an important barometer for high-tech publications. And increasingly, single copy buyers choose PC World over its direct competition — and pay a premium for its award-winning editorial. For this ABC period, PC World extended its #1 lead on the newsstand, selling an average of 70,035 more copies per issue than PC Magazine, and 43,849 more copies per issue than Ziff Davis Smart Business. While both PC Magazine and Ziff Davis Smart Business suffered their second straight ABC filing period of double-digit losses in single copy sales, PC World actually expanded its sales to this critical market by nearly 2%.

Single Copy Average Single Average Single % Increase in

Price Copy Sales Copy Sales Average Single

Six Months Six Months Copy Sales

Ended Ended

6/30/00 6/30/99

PC WORLD $5.99 161,718 158,886 1.8%

ZD Smart Business $4.99** 117,869 146,882 (19.8%)

PC Magazine $4.99 91,683 126,067 (27.3%)

** With its May 2000 name change, the publication carried a $2.50 cover

price.

"With its quality editorial, compelling cover design, and award-winning circulation practices, PC World is clearly the #1 choice among tech-savvy managers," concluded Shawne Burke Pecar, vice president, circulation for PC World.

PC World Communications, Inc. is the publisher of PC World (www.pcworld.com) and WebShopper (www.webshopper.com) and is a subsidiary of IDG, the world's leading IT media, research and exposition company. The winner of the 1999 and 2000 Grand Neal Award for editorial excellence, PC World is the world's largest computer publication with a circulation rate base of 1.25 million. With more than 1.2 million unique visitors per month (Media Metrix, June 2000), PCWorld.com is a leading online resource for PC-product buyers and users. IDG publishes more than 300 computer magazines and newspapers and 4,000 book titles in 80 countries and offers online users the largest network of technology-specific sites around the world through IDG.net ( http://www.idg.net ), which comprises more than 270 targeted Web sites in 70 countries. IDG is also a leading producer of 168 computer-related expositions in 35 countries, and research arm International Data Corporation (IDC) provides computer industry research and analysis through 50 offices in 43 countries worldwide. Company information is available at http://www.idg.com .