The Road to eBusiness Maturity Goes Through Enterprise Information Management, IDC Says

FRAMINGHAM, MA – MAY 8, 2001 – Businesses are racing toward ever-greater uses of Internet technology to achieve ebusiness maturity. According to IDC, those who slow down long enough to formulate an enterprise information management (EIM) strategy will be best positioned to survive the ebusiness transition.

 

"A fully mature ebusiness environment requires a coherent system of interoperating parts, which demands deep integration of all its elements," said Carl Olofson, research director for IDC’s Application Development and Deployment program. "Well-developed techniques for managing foreground, background, and intermediate data are critical to the overall success of any ebusiness deployment effort. A comprehensive approach is called for, and such activities should be coordinated under the banner of EIM."

According to IDC, several data categories figure into an EIM strategy, including transactional, referential, analytical, intermediate, unstructured, and rich media. Some of the key requirements for managing enterprise data are to efficiently synchronize, compare, and integrate reference data; continuously update analytical data; manage transaction data for ebusiness intelligence and problem solutions; and preserve critical external business documentation. "The objective is to make enterprise information available anywhere and manageable regardless of location, while ensuring that it is as current as it needs to be for any context in which it may be accessed," Olofson said.

IDC believes the fundamental strategic elements of EIM for ebusiness include data distribution/consolidation, new functionality, application integration, business intelligence integration, and enterprise content publication.

IDC recently published Surviving the eBusiness Transition: Strategies for Enterprise Information Management (IDC #B24293). This bulletin explores the evolving nature of ebusiness and various possible strategies for enterprise information management designed to address the requirements of ebusiness going forward. It also reviews available software technologies and the product strategies of their vendors. To purchase this bulletin, contact Cheryl Toffel at 1-800-343-4952, extension 4389, or at ctoffel@idc.com.

About IDC

IDC delivers dependable, high-impact insights and advice on the future of ebusiness, the Internet, and technology to help organizations make sound business decisions. IDC forecasts worldwide markets and trends and analyzes business strategies, technologies, and vendors, using a combination of rigorous primary research and in-depth competitive analysis. IDC provides global research with local content through more than 700 analysts in 43 countries worldwide. IDC's customers comprise the world's leading IT suppliers, IT organizations, ebusiness companies, and the financial community. Additional information can be found at http://www.idc.com.

IDC is a division of IDG, the world's leading IT media, research and exposition company.

 

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